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The grave of Isabella Airoldi Casati, d.1886 at age 24.  Sculptor Enrico Butti.  The theme of the elaborate sculpture is ‘Dream of Death’, showing Isabella sleeping, with the deep bas relief depicting angels descended from heaven ready to lead Isabella up a garden avenue to Paradise.
:Cimitero Monumentale di Milano MilanProvincia di MilanoLombardia, Italy

The grave of Isabella Airoldi Casati, d.1886 at age 24.  Sculptor Enrico Butti.  The theme of the elaborate sculpture is ‘Dream of Death’, showing Isabella sleeping, with the deep bas relief depicting angels descended from heaven ready to lead Isabella up a garden avenue to Paradise.

:
Cimitero Monumentale di Milano
Milan
Provincia di Milano
Lombardia, Italy

It’s time for Southern peaches!  It can be a lot of fun making a day of visiting pick-your-own local orchard, ooohing & ahhhing over exactly which tempting fruit should be gently picked & placed carefully in your basket.  The bees are buzzing all over and the warm air carries the ripe, heady scent - it’s perfume.  Bucket or basket in hand and headed down the orchard rows, of course no one can resist that one (ok, maybe more than one!) gold-red orb that simply must be tasted right now.  The first bite releases a burst of juice, dripping at least a little down the chin.  But that’s nothing compared to the burst of peach on the tongue: it brings closed eyes, a smile while chewing, and a small sigh of pure pleasure.
Once home with the bounty, peaches have to be processed quickly.  There’s white peach sangria, peach galette, peach cobbler, peach ice cream, peach fried pies — ooooh I can hardly wait!  Peaches are grown across the South, and this time comes only once a year  :-) 
67 recipes for fresh peaches at Southern Living — you can’t go wrong with Southern Living.

It’s time for Southern peaches!  It can be a lot of fun making a day of visiting pick-your-own local orchard, ooohing & ahhhing over exactly which tempting fruit should be gently picked & placed carefully in your basket.  The bees are buzzing all over and the warm air carries the ripe, heady scent - it’s perfume.  Bucket or basket in hand and headed down the orchard rows, of course no one can resist that one (ok, maybe more than one!) gold-red orb that simply must be tasted right now.  The first bite releases a burst of juice, dripping at least a little down the chin.  But that’s nothing compared to the burst of peach on the tongue: it brings closed eyes, a smile while chewing, and a small sigh of pure pleasure.

Once home with the bounty, peaches have to be processed quickly.  There’s white peach sangria, peach galette, peach cobbler, peach ice cream, peach fried pies — ooooh I can hardly wait!  Peaches are grown across the South, and this time comes only once a year  :-) 

67 recipes for fresh peaches at Southern Living — you can’t go wrong with Southern Living.

For the correct analogy for the mind is not a vessel that needs filling, but wood that needs igniting — no more — and then it motivates one towards originality and instills the desire for truth. Suppose someone were to go and ask his neighbors for fire and find a substantial blaze there, and just stay there continually warming himself: that is no different from someone who goes to someone else to get some of his rationality, and fails to realize that he ought to ignite his innate flame, his own intellect, …

Plutarch (ca. 50 - 120 CE), essay “On Listening”, concluding exhortation.  Translated by Robin Waterfield, 1992 Penguin Classics edition.  Take this opportunity to  read the whole essay.  It’s pretty good, still being studied and incorrectly attributed 2,000 years later.


"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire."  Oversimplified and sounds good, but… incorrectly attributed to William Butler Yeats, aaaaalll over the interwebz.  It’s actually kind of funny, just like the party game of "rumor".  Plutarch might appreciate the irony concerning the ability to listen.  *sigh*… 

I’m sure it’s just my personal obsession with attribution. ~ bohemienne

Eagle’s Gift ~ artist Judy Larson
“Native American legends have always intrigued me,” says Judy Larson, “especially those involving talking animals. So it was difficult not to be enthralled by one such story, a Cheyenne legend in which an eagle is trapped in a dead elk’s antlers. After asking for help from a warrior who is out hunting, he is set free. The eagle is so grateful that his life has been saved that, before flying away, he tells the man to go to the other side of a hill and to look below. There the warrior sees his reward, a beautiful stallion covered with black and white spots exactly like an eagle’s feathers.”Spotted eagle feathers, highly prized by Native Americans, come only from the tail section of immature golden eagles. In Eagle’s Gift, Judy has replicated the eagle feather pattern on the horse’s coat and has hidden therein an eagle or two.
                                           
Judy Larson is a master of scratch board technique.  Scratch board involves the use of abrasive tools to directly remove a surface layer of one value (typically dark) to expose a secondary layer of a contrasting value (typically white).  It is an old, but little-used medium, consisting of a smooth, thin surface of hardened white China clay applied to a (Masonite) board.  It The subject is then painted solidly with black India ink to create a silhouette. The image is then painstakingly engraved into the surface of the artwork. While many artists use steel nibs or engraving tools, Larson prefers to work with X-acto blades, changing them every few minutes to produce as fine a line as possible. Once the subject has been totally engraved, it is a finished black and white illustration, ready for the artist to add color. The methods of adding color are diverse. Larson  prefers a combination of airbrush, gouache, or acrylics for finishing, with frequent rescratching for detail.

Eagle’s Gift ~ artist Judy Larson

“Native American legends have always intrigued me,” says Judy Larson, “especially those involving talking animals. So it was difficult not to be enthralled by one such story, a Cheyenne legend in which an eagle is trapped in a dead elk’s antlers. After asking for help from a warrior who is out hunting, he is set free. The eagle is so grateful that his life has been saved that, before flying away, he tells the man to go to the other side of a hill and to look below. There the warrior sees his reward, a beautiful stallion covered with black and white spots exactly like an eagle’s feathers.”
Spotted eagle feathers, highly prized by Native Americans, come only from the tail section of immature golden eagles. In Eagle’s Gift, Judy has replicated the eagle feather pattern on the horse’s coat and has hidden therein an eagle or two.

                                          

Judy Larson is a master of scratch board technique.  Scratch board involves the use of abrasive tools to directly remove a surface layer of one value (typically dark) to expose a secondary layer of a contrasting value (typically white).  It is an old, but little-used medium, consisting of a smooth, thin surface of hardened white China clay applied to a (Masonite) board.  It The subject is then painted solidly with black India ink to create a silhouette. The image is then painstakingly engraved into the surface of the artwork. While many artists use steel nibs or engraving tools, Larson prefers to work with X-acto blades, changing them every few minutes to produce as fine a line as possible. Once the subject has been totally engraved, it is a finished black and white illustration, ready for the artist to add color. The methods of adding color are diverse. Larson  prefers a combination of airbrush, gouache, or acrylics for finishing, with frequent rescratching for detail.

Introversion

Excerpt, HuffPost blog :

"A lot of people have the wrong idea about introversion and confuse it with shyness. But shyness and introversion are not the same. As described by one neuroscientist I spoke to, shyness is behavior: acting fearful in social situations. Introversion is motivation: low drive to participate in social situations. So while shy people might want to socialize but find it intimidating, introverts have the skills but can take or leave socializing.

Also, you can overcome shyness if you want. Introversion seems to be hardwired, and it doesn’t need to be overcome. It’s fine as it is.

You can be shy and introverted, but you also can be not shy and introverted. (Same with extroversion. Shy extroverts have a hard time of it.)And introversion-extroversion, like other traits, exists on a continuum; you can be very introverted (or extroverted) or just a little.


Jung defined introversion in terms of energy: Extroverts are energized by time with other people, introverts are drained by it and crave copious time alone. While this theory lacks any empirical backing (what is this “energy” and how do we measure it?), introverts know what it means. Science will just have to catch up.”

~ Sophia Dembling, Nine Signs That You Might Be An Introvert

**Excerpt from Scientific American:
Lucy Film Hinges on Brain Capacity Myth


     The notion that we humans have massive reserves of gray matter just sitting there waiting to be summoned into service has obvious appeal, but there is no scientific evidence to support it. 


     Apparently [Besson] missed or ignored the many scientists who would have surely informed him that the idea that we use only a small portion of our brain (10 percent, the story usually goes) is wrong. As Barry L. Beyerstein of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver explained in a piece for Scientific American:


     “…the brain, like all our other organs, has been shaped by natural selection. Brain tissue is metabolically expensive both to grow and to run, and it strains credulity to think that evolution would have permitted squandering of resources on a scale necessary to build and maintain such a massively underutilized organ. Moreover, doubts are fueled by ample evidence from clinical neurology. Losing far less than 90% of the brain to accident or disease has catastrophic consequences. What is more, observing the effects of head injury reveals that there does not seem to be any area of the brain that can be destroyed by strokes, head trauma, or other manner, without leaving the patient with some kind of functional deficit. Likewise, electrical stimulation of points in the brain during neurosurgery has failed so far to uncover any dormant areas where no percept, emotion or movement is elicited by applying these tiny currents….”


     Neither do we regularly use only a little bit of the brain at a time, as science writer Robynne Boyd reported in a piece for Scientific American. She quoted neurologist Barry Gordon of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine:


     “It turns out though, that we use virtually every part of the brain, and that [most of] the brain is active almost all the time,” Gordon adds. “Let’s put it this way: the brain represents 3% of the body’s weight and uses 20% of the body’s energy.”
………………………………………………………………………….
Well, darn - it was a nice fantasy anyway  :-)


(*image from Dcuo Post)

**Excerpt from Scientific American:

Lucy Film Hinges on Brain Capacity Myth

     The notion that we humans have massive reserves of gray matter just sitting there waiting to be summoned into service has obvious appeal, but there is no scientific evidence to support it.

     Apparently [Besson] missed or ignored the many scientists who would have surely informed him that the idea that we use only a small portion of our brain (10 percent, the story usually goes) is wrong. As Barry L. Beyerstein of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver explained in a piece for Scientific American:

     “…the brain, like all our other organs, has been shaped by natural selection. Brain tissue is metabolically expensive both to grow and to run, and it strains credulity to think that evolution would have permitted squandering of resources on a scale necessary to build and maintain such a massively underutilized organ. Moreover, doubts are fueled by ample evidence from clinical neurology. Losing far less than 90% of the brain to accident or disease has catastrophic consequences. What is more, observing the effects of head injury reveals that there does not seem to be any area of the brain that can be destroyed by strokes, head trauma, or other manner, without leaving the patient with some kind of functional deficit. Likewise, electrical stimulation of points in the brain during neurosurgery has failed so far to uncover any dormant areas where no percept, emotion or movement is elicited by applying these tiny currents….”

     Neither do we regularly use only a little bit of the brain at a time, as science writer Robynne Boyd reported in a piece for Scientific American. She quoted neurologist Barry Gordon of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine:

     “It turns out though, that we use virtually every part of the brain, and that [most of] the brain is active almost all the time,” Gordon adds. “Let’s put it this way: the brain represents 3% of the body’s weight and uses 20% of the body’s energy.”

………………………………………………………………………….

Well, darn - it was a nice fantasy anyway  :-)

(*image from Dcuo Post)

The Prophet ~ author Kahlil Gibran (b.1883 - d.1931)
While most people know Kahlil Gibran only as the author of “The Prophet,” he wrote seventeen books, nine in Arabic and eight in English.
Gibran was an artist as well as a writer, producing over 700 paintings, watercolors, and drawings.  He willed the contents of his studio to lifelong friend Mary Haskell, who donated about 80 works to the Telfair Museum in Savannah, Georgia.  This is the largest public collection of Gibran’s art in the United States.
Fulfilling Gibran’s wish to be buried in his native Lebanon, Haskell and her sister Mariana purchased the Mar Sarkis Monastery, where he is entombed. It is now the Gibran Museum.  The Museum holds 440 original paintings and drawings, as well as his private manuscripts and his furniture and belongings from his New York studio.

The Prophet ~ author Kahlil Gibran (b.1883 - d.1931)

While most people know Kahlil Gibran only as the author of “The Prophet,” he wrote seventeen books, nine in Arabic and eight in English.

Gibran was an artist as well as a writer, producing over 700 paintings, watercolors, and drawings. He willed the contents of his studio to lifelong friend Mary Haskell, who donated about 80 works to the Telfair Museum in Savannah, Georgia.  This is the largest public collection of Gibran’s art in the United States.

Fulfilling Gibran’s wish to be buried in his native Lebanon, Haskell and her sister Mariana purchased the Mar Sarkis Monastery, where he is entombed. It is now the Gibran Museum.  The Museum holds 440 original paintings and drawings, as well as his private manuscripts and his furniture and belongings from his New York studio.

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